March 2017 Print

President's Report

Save the date for our 1st ever Spring Conference. More details to follow very soon.

May 17-19, 2017

Pickwick Landing State Park

Great education programs along with an expo for our vendors. Look out for details in the next week.

Daniel Bailey

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Calendar of Events

May 17-19, 2017

Pickwick Landing State Park

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Healthcare News

Emergency Lights, Battery Powered Lights and the Code –

First let me start off that I am no expert around this subject, so some details may be left out. Periodic testing of emergency lighting equipment is needed to help ensure such equipment will perform as needed upon failure of normal power. 7.9.3.1.2 and 7.9.3.1.3 allows using newer technology to help reduce manual labor needed to keep the system in proper operating condition. Here is some information around Exit Lights and Battery Powered Lights that you should pay attention to:

NFPA 101 -2012 7.9.3 – Periodic Testing of Emergency Lighting Equipment.

Must follow 1 of the follow three methods.

  1. 7.9.3.1.1 Testing of required emergency lighting systems shall be permitted to be conducted as follows:              

    1. Functional Testing conducted monthly, with a minimum of 3 weeks and a maximum of 5 weeks between tests, for not less than 30 seconds.

    2. The test interval shall be permitted to be extended beyond 30 days with the approval of the AJH. (See performing a risk assessment outlined at the end of this article to comply with this item).

    3. Functional testing shall be conducted annually for a minimum of 1 ½ hours if the emergency lighting system is battery powered.

    4. The emergency lighting equipment shall be fully operation for the duration of the tests required by a and c above.

    5. Written records of visual inspections and tests shall be kept by the owner for review by AHJ.

  2. 7.9.3.1.2 (This applies to lights equipped with self-testing/self-diagnostic emergency lights but not tied to a computer based system). Testing of required emergency lighting system shall be permitted to be conducted as follows:

    1. Self-testing/self-diagnostic battery-operated emergency lighting equipment shall be provided.

    2. Not less than once every 30 days, self-testing/self-diagnostic battery-operated emergency lighting equipment shall automatically perform a test with duration of a minimum of 30 seconds and a diagnostic routine.

    3. Self-testing/self-diagnostic battery-operated emergency lighting equipment shall indicate failures by a status indicator.

    4. A visual inspection shall be performed at intervals not exceeding 30 days.

    5. Functional testing shall be conducted annually for a minimum of 1 1⁄2 hours.

    6. Self-testing/self-diagnostic battery-operated emergency lighting equipment shall be fully operational for the duration of the 1 1⁄2-hour test.

    7. Written records of visual inspections and tests shall be kept by the owner for review by AHJ.

  3. 7.9.3.1.3 (This applies to lights that are tied into a computer based system that self performs the testing requirements). Testing of required emergency lighting system shall be permitted to be conducted as follows:

    1. Computer-based, self-testing/self-diagnostic battery operated emergency lighting equipment shall be provided.

    2. Not less than once every 30 days, emergency lighting equipment shall automatically perform a test with duration of a minimum of 30 seconds and a diagnostic routine.

    3. The emergency lighting equipment shall automatically perform annually a test for a minimum of 11⁄2 hours.

    4. The emergency lighting equipment shall be fully operational for the duration of the tests required by 7.9.3.1.3(2) and (3).

    5. (5) The computer-based system shall be capable of providing a report of the history of tests and failures at all times.

 So from the above, we can gather a few take a ways. First, you need a complete inventory of all egress lights and battery operated devices. Second, you need to inspect all egress and battery devices monthly along with testing the battery devices for 30 seconds every month. Annually you must test each battery devices for 90 minutes. Document the results and keep in your records.

The next item to discuss is battery devices located in areas where deep sedation and general anesthesia is administered. Being these devices are not considered life safety, they are treated slightly different.

NFPA 99 2012 edition 6.3.2.2.11 Battery Powered Lighting units.

One or more battery powered lighting units shall be provided with the lighting level sufficient to terminate procedures. Units are tested monthly for 30 seconds, and shall be capable of providing lighting for 1 ½ hours, however are only tested annually for 30 minutes. Again, a complete inventory of the devices must be maintained and testing results recorded and kept in your records.

NFPA 110 2010 edition 7.3 Lighting

The Level 1 or Level 2 EPS equipment locations shall be provided with battery powered emergency lighting connected to the load side. The lighting level shall be 3.0 ft candles. The code does not indicate testing frequency, however, I would treat this same an Emergency Egress testing of 30 seconds every month and 90 minutes annually.

So take the time to assess your inventory and update your PM Tasks to ensure your are compliant and maintaining a safe facility. By the way, most of these items apply to generally all occupancies. So be sure you are including every location you maintain.

Performing a risk assessment to move from monthly testing frequency – This must be approved by the State AHJ.

IF you want to comply with item b above you must include the following in your risk assessment:

        1. Number of egress lighting units

        2. Number of 30-second test for analysis

        3. Re-evaluation period

        4. Number of fixtures found obstructed

        5. Number of fixtures found misaligned

        6. Fixtures found to be missing

        7. Fixtures found damaged

        8. Battery design

        9. Type of light source

        10. Fixture design (manufacture)

        11. Number of light fixtures per exit path

        12. Existence of fire, smoke and thermal barriers

        13. Evacuation capability

        14. Maximum egress time

        15. Hours of occupancy

        16. Number of recorded bulb failures

        17. Number of recorded fixture failures

        18. Single fixture reliability

        19. Repairs – Mean time to repair

        20. Lighted egress path probability of success or failure Month and Quarterly

Jerry Ferguson CFM CHFM

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